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Nature's Colors in Hoskote

My birding journey this week took me to Hoskote, where I had a delightful brush with colors in nature. Take a look at the pics I captured!



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I began with a beautiful Oriental magpie robin, a black and white bird, set against a lush green background.



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And then against the white sky, its black and white colors remained stunningly prominent.



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Soon, the white and gray sky transformed into a lovely blue adorned with white clouds. 



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As I walked to the bitter gourd farm, I noticed a colorful piece hanging at the entrance, designed to divert one's attention. In Hindu culture, the evil eye is considered a malevolent gaze that may bring harm to its target. To counter this, the chilies, lemon, and charcoal hanging there are believed to possess protective properties, serving as a charm to ward off the evil eye.



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Indeed, it seems that the charm is working effectively, as the bitter gourd crop is thriving and growing well.



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The farm has produced an abundant harvest.



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Having encountered them countless times, the thrill of spotting Ashy Prinias has diminished for me. Nevertheless, here's one more for you.



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I came across an Asian green bee-eater perched nonchalantly on a fence.



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Here's a closeup shot.



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I saw many bee-eaters in different colors, their shades changing with the lighting and background.





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I saw a plain tiger butterfly getting caught in a spider's trap, and my initial impulse was to rescue it. But I restrained myself, realizing that interfering would disrupt the balance of nature and deny the spider's hard-earned hunting skills developed through millions of years of evolution.




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Leaving the beautiful butterfly to its fate, I was promptly greeted by the striking sight of a female Trumpet Tail dragonfly.



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I managed to capture a bee-eater in flight, but it was partially concealed in the shot, leaving me a bit unsatisfied.



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Jungle babblers seemed to be everywhere, and I took some shots of one darting from one branch to another.




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My attention was drawn to a lone and active male in the Baya Weaver colony. He repeatedly flew to the nearby reeds, using his strong beak to strip and collect strands.  Then, he would return to his partially built nest to weave. 



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A male Baya Weaver can make up to 500 trips to construct a single nest, and the entire process takes approximately 18 days.





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The spotted dove blending into the pinkish background was my favorite shot of the day.



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The Indian pond heron was the lone water bird that caught my eye.



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My eyes were drawn to a long-tailed shrike, resting on a branch.



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My final sighting was a Brahminy kite on the prowl, like a pirate ready to snatch food from other water birds.




I hope the post was to your liking, and I am eager to hear your thoughts about it.

Linked with Mosaic Monday


48 comments:

  1. Would be great if the farmer would clean up the trash on his property.

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  2. Beautiful as always and those bee-eaters are really living jewels but the spotted dove is indeed the nicest photo of the whole lot today with a great background.

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  3. It's so hard to leave a butterfly to its fate. Those bee-eaters are my favorite shots---so many colors.

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  4. Lovely pictures once again. The story behind the charm is really interesting.

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  5. Beautiful photos! I wish you did not write that you left the butterfly to its fate, I could have imagined that you did save him This is going to bother me all day..... Butterfly's fate could have been that you showed up at the right time to save him...... it would have made a huge difference to him.

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    1. Thank you for appreciating the beauty of the photos! I understand your wish for a happier outcome for the butterfly, and it's heartwarming that you imagined a scenario where it was saved. Nature can be both breathtaking and bittersweet, where each creature's fate intertwines with others. What might be good for one, like the butterfly's escape, could be a missed opportunity for the spider to find sustenance. This delicate balance reminds us of the interconnectedness of all living beings in the ecosystem, where every action has a ripple effect. I hope the beauty of nature continues to inspire and amaze you, even in its complexities. πŸ¦‹πŸ•·️

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    2. I understand about ripple effect. You chose the ripples to favor the spider. Your presence could have made ripples to favor the butterfly. Your non-doing anything had ripples that favored the spider. You are not just an observer, we are on earth to be part of it. Anyway, you have your opinion, I have mine.

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    3. I understand your point about the potential for different ripples had I chosen to intervene. While I made a conscious decision to stay non-partisan in this instance, I value the diversity of opinions on how we engage with nature.
      Nature's balance is delicate, and sometimes it's best to refrain from interfering to let natural processes unfold. Being non-partisan allows us to appreciate the intricate web of life without imposing our own preferences on the ecosystem.

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  6. Wonderful series of photos.
    The Ashy Prinias is beautiful.
    But the Asian green bee-eater is my favorite.
    I enjoyed your photos.
    Greetings Irma

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  7. Beautiful photos - love the bee eater's colors

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  8. Fantastic photos and as always not easy to pick a favorite. The butterfly story was poignant. We value its fluttering beauty and think the spider is creepy but both strive to survive as we all do. That said, I could not have resisted freeing the butterfly, although the difficult choice of not interfering with nature for the most part seems quite noble.

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  9. The photos are absolutely fantastic, and as usual, it's difficult to choose a favorite. I'm delighted to see that the bitter gourd crop is thriving and growing so well. They look exceptionally beautiful.

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  10. Bee eater is looking gorgeous and magnificent!

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  11. Such beautiful captures of the bee-eaters!

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  12. bee-eaters look so wonderful....
    excellent captures

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  13. So beautiful birds, Great captured

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  14. Beautiful detail in your shots and I like that dragonfly. My grandmother always called them snake doctors. Thank you for linking up.

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  15. I appreciate learning a new way to deflect the evil eye. I'm more familiar with using one's open palm in front of one's forehead, and a few other ways, involving images of a hand and other things. The birds are beautiful.
    best, mae at maefood.blogspot.com

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  16. Beautiful critters also today in your post.
    I am quite happy as I photographed my first European bee-eater in Verona this week.
    I did not think it lived in northern Italy.

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  17. Hello,
    Great post, I am sure the farmer is happy with his great harvest. Beautiful bird sightings. Some of my favorites are the Asian Green Bee-eater, the Ashy Prinias and the Baya Weaver . Great captures of the dragonfly, Indian Pond Heron and the Long-tailed Shrike. They are all beautiful photos. Thank you for linking up and sharing your post. Take care, have a great weekend. PS, thank so much for leaving me a comment.

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  18. ...wow, what a collection!

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  19. I think the evil eye has cast a glance in our weather direction. I love the pics of the Bee eaters, surely one of nature's finest family of birds. I once, and once only manged to capture one in flight but would settle for a few of your Little greens posing like your shots. Have a great Sunday.

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  20. Beautiful photos as always. I enjoyed seeing all the different birds. Thanks for sharing.








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  21. Gorgeous captures and delightful commentary!

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  22. We try our best not to disturb anything in nature. I think it's best to observe. I always love your photos and saved your post for the last one to view today. Love the beginning with the watercolor effects!

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  23. Oh such professional nature photography ~ they are all wonderful ~ and creative ~ too ~

    Wishing you good health, laughter and love in your days,
    A ShutterBug Explores,
    aka (A Creative Harbor)

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  24. My favourites are Ashy Prinias, well shot.Also the Bee-eater, perfect.

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  25. What fantastic photos and there is so much colour.

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  26. Dear Shiju,
    I also saw such amulets on the house against the evil eye or against bad luck in India - chillies were always there, but I didn't know lemons and charcoal until now. This is definitely an eye-catcher, even if you do NOT look bad ;-)
    Your nature and bird shots are stunning as always. If I had seen a butterfly in a spider's web, I would have had the same thoughts as you. Bee-eaters are such pretty birds and Baya Weavers are so hard-working! You're right about the photo of the spotted dove - with the color matching background it really would make a beautiful poster. Did you know that you can share posts related to Gardening , Nature and birds on this blog:
    https://jaipurgardening.blogspot.com/
    Thank you for your very nice comments!
    All the best from Austria
    Traude
    🌼πŸͺ΄πŸ€πŸŒ»❤️🌼πŸͺ΄πŸ€πŸŒ»

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  27. Beautiful captures as always love the close ups :-)

    Have an artistictastic week πŸ‘

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  28. Always gorgeous photos here! Thanks so much for sharing at http://image-in-ing.blogspot.com/2023/08/wordy-wednesday-this-week.html

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  29. A wonderful Post again ... I enjoyed very much, because I learned some more of your nature. Thank you for sharing at

    MosaicMonday

    Greetings by Heidrun

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  30. Wow, what beautiful birds, what intetesting nests! But the butterflies are wonderful. It's pity that they ended their lives like this...
    Happy WW πŸ€—
    https://vis-si-realitate-2.blogspot.com/2023/08/catei-fericiti-miercurea-fara-cuvinte.html

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  31. fantastic...... the way Oriental magpie robin changes the colors....
    wonderful photos

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  32. Your photos are magnific. You are so talented!
    I appreciate a lot your decision related to the butterfly. It's wise,even its painful.
    Happy WW and a fine week!

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  33. The Baya Weaver‘s nest is remarkable!

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  34. Great photos! I would have freed the butterfly. ;)

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  35. These photos are delightful as is the story you tell throughout of a different culture. Thanks for sharing and the sketches at the top are also lovely.

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  36. Your knowledge is wonderful Shiju and combined with the photos, it's such a great experience for your readers and for you as a long time record!! Thank you for linking up this week for WWandPics on Denyse Whelan Blogs to Connect. Next week, I hope you join in again too, and be there to read my “C” for change & connection post! Warm wishes, Denyse.

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  37. The yellow waxtail mating is such an amazing scene! You always photographed the nature so well

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  38. The bee eater is still a pretty amazing shot. As for the bitter cucumbers (we call them), I read they get rid of bloating so I gave it a whirl but they were quite an effort to eat a lot of. I need another recipe...Thanks for sharing with #Allseasons

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  39. you are very good at painting your birds. :)

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  40. Interesting about the evil eye charm...Lovely photos...Michelle

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  41. Hi I am so glad to found an Indian blogger , I have observed it over the years that Jungle babblers which were mostly spotted in the Autumn and winter in our region have adapted in our climate like other birds be it Indian
    mynas and Sparrows which stays for the most part of year. I am happy you were able to capture Green Bee eater in flight which requires swiftness and precision. Its fascinating to observe masterful art of Indian Baya nest no matter how many times we see , the' Nazar ka totka ' is very relatable. Indian dove captured against pinkish blue sky is so serene and calming. Thank you for joining Garden Affair. It is a pleasure visiting your post.

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  42. the bitter gourd is one of my favorites.... love it

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