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Fascinating Fort Kochi

Continuing our exploration of coastal Kerala, I am chronicling here our visit to Fort Kochi. 

Brief history: The territory of Fort Kochi was granted to the Portuguese in 1503 by the Rajah of Kochi who gave them permission to build Fort Emmanuel. The name Fort Kochi comes from this fort, which the Dutch later destroyed.The Dutch held Fort Kochi in their possession for 112 years until 1795, when the British took control by defeating the Dutch...


Kochi was a fishing village in the Kingdom of Kochi since the pre-colonial Kerala. You can still see a lot of fishing activities around here...


A game of chess shows that life is leisurely and relaxed here...


View from the beach walkway...


Wife tried a wreath a vendor was selling on the Beach walkway...


More fishing action...





Even the egrets were trying their luck at fishing...








Princess Street also known as Loafer’s Corner of Fort Kochi...


Princess street is the most famous street of Fort Kochi which gives a slice of authentic colonial European architecture...


Princess street is the only street that never faced any raid or demolitions in past...





Princess street is a prefect destination for evening walk with numerous western styled cafes, souvenir shops, art galleries and heritage complexes...







A juvenile Lygosoma punctata skink...




Beautiful graffiti at Vasco da Gama square...










You can sit on the benches and watch the ships pass by...






The landmark that causes more public and visitor interest is a series of precolonial Chinese fishing nets on the waterfront...


The Chinese fishing nets are believed to have been introduced by Chinese traders in the early 14th century...






There were more than 100 Chinese fishing nets, though currently only a few remain in working condition...


Sunset through the Chinese fishing nets...


As we headed back, saw beautiful reflections from the boat ride to Marine drive...



The sights and feel of the place was quite enjoyable. Hope you liked the post. Do let me know your thought in the comments section below...


Trip to Mattancherry

On our recent visit to Kerala, wife and me explored Mattancherry, a city with historical significance which was once a spice trading hub in the 16th century.  I found many interesting photo opportunities there. Here's a photo tour...

A selfie in front of Dutch Palace..


Dutch Palace - Constructed by the Portuguese in 1568 as a gift to Maharaja of Kochi, Veera Kerala Varma, after he granted permission to construct Fort Immanunel. During the Dutch siege of Kochi, many parts of the original palace were destroyed. However the Dutch Governor repaired the palace and renamed as Dutch Palace.


The most interesting part is the mural room, which has the entire Ramayana and Mahabharat depicted in a single mural. A glimpse of the murals can be seen in the background. Photography inside the room is not allowed to preserve the murals...


Dutch palace window with a view of the surrounding green...


In the 16th century, Jewish refugees from Jerusalem settled here during the Crusades. Many Jews lived in the area until the creation of Israel, today there is only a handful. Jew Town is a heritage zone with several antique/handicraft shops...



Creative umbrella at Jews street...


Colourful masks...


You can still find many shops selling exotic spices...


Lamp...


Jew town...





A kathakali dancer's sculpture...


To perform Kathakali, artists deck out in elaborate costumes and colorful makeup to tell stories from Hindu epics...





Paradesi Synagogue was constructed in 1568 after allowing Jewish refugees from Jerusalem to settle here during the Crusades making this the Commonwealth's oldest Synagogue...
























I tried the sword and a warrior's helmet at the antique museum...






The biriyani at Kayees Rahmathulla Cafe is a must try. It has a unique flavour with succulent meat and the tamarind sauce was an interesting accompaniment...


Mattancherry is primarily a spice trading city, famous for its thriving Gujarati settlement brought to the city in the 16th and 17th centuries by the spice trade. Beautiful Gujarati Haveli type architecture of Shree Jalaram Dham...


Shree Jalaram Dham is named after the bhakta Jalaram Pradhan Thakkar, born in 1800. People believe that pilgrims who are given food by Jalaram bapa will definitely reach the doors of heaven. The kitchens of Jalaram Dham never run dry and is believed to be blessed by Jalaram bapa to serve thousands of pilgrims daily...



Beautiful cross-stitch embroidery...



The Jew street has some lovely paintings on display...








The old Mattancerry Bridge was built in 1940 by Sir Robert Charles Bristo. This bridge connects Willingdon Island with Fort Kochi. The center span of the bridge is designed in such a way that it can be raised using a spring mechanism. As it resembles the British construction of bridge in London, It is also known as London bridge of Kochi...




After exploring Mattancherry we proceeded towards Fort Kochi. My next blog post will feature my exploration of Fort Kochi. Hope you liked this post. Do let me know your thoughts in the comments section below...



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